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Fort Collins Post Office

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1912, James Knox Taylor, OSA. 201 S. College Ave. (corner of Oak St.)

James Knox Taylor, Supervising Architect of the Treasury in Washington, probably never saw this or hundreds of other federal buildings for which he is the architect of record. He sanctioned for Fort Collins a typically noble Beaux-Arts post office with Renaissance Revival details and classical proportions. Built for $100,000 on the site of the Fort Collins Military Cemetery, it is a concrete shell faced with coursed limestone from Bedford, Indiana, punctuated by massive arched windows. Above the transom level and beneath a slightly hipped red tile roof, small rectangular windows are grouped in threes amid frieze carvings, including the seal of the United States in Alabama marble. Large, ornate medallions over the two main entrances carry the letters US flanked by cornucopias. After the post office moved to modern quarters in the 1970s, its old home was renovated for shops, offices, and an art gallery.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
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Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Fort Collins Post Office", [Fort Collins, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-LR15.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 230-231.

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