You are here

Anderson House

-A A +A
1901, Montezuma Fuller. 300 S. Howes St. (near southeast corner of Olive St.) (NR)

This may have been the prototype for a design by Fuller which won second prize in a contest sponsored by Carpentry and Building magazine in 1902. His two-story frame residence for Peter Anderson on a rough-cut local sandstone foundation has a restored clapboard exterior under a hipped roof. Five bays behind the long porch of the main (west) facade and a two-story south bay enliven the rectangular plan. An arched, sidelighted doorway gives a Palladian look to the second level of the west face. Fuller designed this house for a Norwegian immigrant who parlayed his start as a harness maker into interests in ranching, freight transport, banking, live-stock, and the local beet factory of Great Western Sugar. Anderson's Farm Implement Store, beautifully restored in 1993, still stands at 222 Walnut. Peter Anderson's farm near the sugar beet plant became Andersonville, where he built small frame houses for Hispanic workers.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Thomas J. Noel
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Thomas J. Noel, "Anderson House", [Fort Collins, Colorado], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/CO-01-LR18.

Print Source

Buildings of Colorado, Thomas J. Noel. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997, 231-231.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,