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The Paris

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Idaho Furniture Co. Building
1892. 102 N. Main St.

This two-story, rusticated sandstone building is an example of the Richardsonian Romanesque style and was one of the first stone buildings in Pocatello. Located at Center Street and Main Street, the structure, along with the Seavers Building across the street, provides a dramatic entry into the historic downtown. With their solidity and weight, these Romanesque Revival buildings asserted that the town was here to stay. Three grand arches on the building’s south facade are among the most memorable architectural elements in the historic district. The Main Street facade returns to more rectangular and less dramatic window shapes. The building is also notable for its cornice detail and triangular pediment, again on the south elevation. For many years, the building housed the Idaho Furniture Company. Today it is known as the Paris, an apparel store and wedding shop.

References

Attebery, Jennifer Eastman, and Terrance W. Epperson, “Pocatello Historic District,” Bannock County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Inventory–Nomination Form, 1982. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

Mallette, Walter P., and Lance J. Holladay. Images of America Pocatello. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2013.

Writing Credits

Author: 
D. Nels Reese
Coordinator: 
Anne L. Marshall
Wendy R. McClure
Phillip G. Mead
D. Nels Reese
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Data

Timeline

  • 1892

    Construction

What's Nearby

Citation

D. Nels Reese, "The Paris", [Pocatello, Idaho], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ID-01-005-0051-01.

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