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New Orleans 8th District Police Station (Bank of Louisiana)

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1826, Bickel, Hamblet and Fox; c. 1861 alterations, James Gallier Jr. 334 Royal St.
  • (Photograph by Karen Kingsley)
  • (Photograph by Karen Kingsley)

After this massive rectangular two-story building of stucco-covered brick was damaged by fire in 1861, Gallier added a Tuscan entrance portico. He also gave the bank a more imposing appearance by replacing the Ionic capitals of the two-story engaged columns with weightier Tuscan capitals. A prominent cornice and balustrade adorned with urns on rectangular pedestals complete the ornamentation of the building. The fence and gates, based on Robert Adam’s gates to Lansdowne House, London, were produced by a New York company in 1827. After the bank’s assets were liquidated in 1867, the building served as the state capitol from 1869 to 1870, after which it housed an auction exchange, a concert hall, a saloon, a criminal court, and a tourist office.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas
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Data

Timeline

  • 1826

    Built
  • 1860

    Alterations

What's Nearby

Citation

Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas, "New Orleans 8th District Police Station (Bank of Louisiana)", [New Orleans, Louisiana], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/LA-02-OR18.

Print Source

buildings of new orleans book

Buildings of New Orleans, Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 34-34.

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