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Sears, Roebuck and Company

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1928, George C. Nimmons. 1815 Massachusetts Ave.
  • Sears, Roebuck and Company

Rapid residential development around Porter Square in the early twentieth century made it an attractive location for Sears, Roebuck and Company. Chicago architect George C. Nimmons had established a company model that combined verticality with Art Deco–stylized classical details, also seen in Sears' Fenway store in Boston (now Landmark Center; FL30). A great square tower with recessed spandrels rising above the bulk of the buff brick store ensured that the building would be a prominent landmark. The Porter Square store closed in 1986 and, after a complicated history of varied development projects, Lesley College acquired the building in 1994, renovating the interior and building an addition to the west.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Sears, Roebuck and Company", [Cambridge, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-NC10.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 360-360.

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