You are here

Commercial Building (Bottineau County Bank)

-A A +A
Bottineau County Bank
c. 1901. Main St. at 6th St.

This former bank celebrates the stonecutter’s craft, which is well represented in the Bottineau community. Although a preference for cut-stone construction is associated with Scots and Irish immigrants in the community, notably the W. R. McIntosh House (BU5), much of it was executed by English, Swedish, and Native American construction crews. The one-story building’s walls are formed of coursed split-faced granite stones, and it has three large arched windows and a recessed arched entrance, with randomly sized square openings toward the rear. Openings are framed with dressed sandstone, and red sandstone is used for quoins, arches, and sills. The entire effect makes a strong and secure appearance for this bank.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Commercial Building (Bottineau County Bank)", [Bottineau, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-BU3.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 126-126.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,