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Charles H. Rue House

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1932, Paul W. Jones. 1502 9th St. S

Charles Rue, a Fargo contractor, built three stylistically similar houses, one for himself and his wife, and the others for his two children. Architect Jones was a newcomer to Fargo in the 1930s who worked confidently in a wide variety of architectural styles, including this avant-garde house, an early example of International Style in the United States. Few Fargo architects are known for work that employs pure geometries and colors with no historically derived or extraneous ornament. Jones studied in Paris in 1930 and likely was exposed to European modernism while there. The blocky angular massing of the house, roof terrace, and use of glass block are among the identifying features of the period. This open-plan house is permeated with daylight, to an extent that is surprising for the small pierced window openings, and is achieved with glass block and with windows positioned to wrap around corners.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
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Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Charles H. Rue House", [Fargo, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-CS34.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 46-46.

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