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Jerome B. Siegel House

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1939, Paul W. Jones. 1550 8th St. S

This distinctive house has Prairie School influences grafted onto the geometric massing of modernism. A simplified palette of three materials—dark-stained wood, dark red brick, and tan stucco—contributes to a strong composition that is anchored by the vertical two-story brick wall that breaks the plane of the overhanging flat roof. The ground story is of brick and glass block, while the stuccoed upper story projects slightly at the front of the house with a vertical stack of four, square windows grouped together. Fenestration is organized by an implied grid and on the south side wall the grid extends beyond the rear wall in the form of a trellis. The interior is a spatially open plan with innovative details that emphasize the openness and enable daylight to penetrate.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
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Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Jerome B. Siegel House", [Fargo, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-CS35.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 46-46.

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