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Downtown Commercial District

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1880–1940. Bounded roughly by 5th St., Gertrude Ave., 4th Ave. N, and the Red River

The downtown includes brick commercial buildings in styles ranging from Richardsonian Romanesque to Beaux-Arts classical, Art Deco, and the International Style. Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of Grand Forks is the extent to which historic buildings have been preserved and rehabilitated following the devastating flood and fire of 1997 that engulfed most of the community and especially the downtown area. This renewal has been guided by an active Historic Preservation Commission supported by city government. Grand Forks’ leaders have subsequently shared their experience with flood recovery and knowledge of its impacts on historic architecture with other flood-impacted communities regionally and nationally.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
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Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Downtown Commercial District", [Grand Forks, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-GF2.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 73-74.

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