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Apartment Building

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1940, J. C. Nicholson. 416 Melarkey St.
  • Apartment Building

This unpretentious Moderne apartment building is unique in style among houses in Winnemucca. The cream-colored, two-story building on a corner lot has an L-shaped plan, with small projections from the first story to accommodate entry doors with porthole windows. Modern features include recessed and projecting wall panels and multipane, steel-frame casement windows. Some of these windows wrap around the outer corners of the building—perhaps a nod to the International Style. Other touches include stepped parapets and a fin projecting above the roofline and over an entry bay on the 4th Street side. H. P. Aste, proprietor of the Winnemucca Laundry, had the apartments built in a modern style to advertise the newness and modern conveniences of the complex and thus attract tenants. The style was popular for apartment complexes built at the time in larger western cities such as Reno (see NW024, Loomis Manor Apartments) and Salt Lake City.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
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Data

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Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Apartment Building", [Winnemucca, Nevada], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/NV-01-NO20.

Print Source

Buildings of Nevada, Julie Nicoletta. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000, 139-139.

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