You are here

Pine Creek Iron Bridge

-A A +A
1889, Berlin Iron Bridge Company. River Rd. (TWP 566) over Pine Creek, approximately 0.8 miles upstream from the Susquehanna River

The Pine Creek bridge is one of only three Berlin lenticular truss bridges with Warren pattern web members that survive in the United States. The Berlin Iron Bridge Company's sales force was so successful in convincing county commissioners that their bridges were less expensive to build that all but one of the lenticular truss bridges in the nation were built by the company. The only bridge they did not build is the Smithfield Street Bridge over the Monongahela River at Pittsburgh, designed in 1882 by Gustav Lindenthal ( AL4). The Berlin Iron Bridge Company was headquartered in East Berlin, Connecticut, until its 1900 merger with the American Bridge Company, a subsidiary of U.S. Steel Corporation.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Lu Donnelly et al.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Lu Donnelly et al., "Pine Creek Iron Bridge", [Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-01-CN13.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 1

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, Lu Donnelly, H. David Brumble IV, and Franklin Toker. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2010, 433-434.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,