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St. Matthew's Episcopal Church

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1820–1824, William Marvin(?); c. 1864; 1893; 1954. Main St. (PA 706)

St. Matthew's is Federal style on the outside and Georgian Revival on the inside. In 1799, Connecticut sheepherders organized St. Matthew's Protestant Episcopal Church and in 1820 began this clapboarded frame church with the front Palladian window and roundarched gallery windows that were common for New England churches of that period. The Greek Revival features were added later, possibly after a fire in 1863. By 1864 the church had a pilasters and entablature entrance, fullheight corner Doric pilasters, an Ionic frieze, and a flush-board pediment, elements also found on the First Congregational Church in Harford, Susquehanna County ( SQ3). In 1893, the congregation remodeled the interior, making most changes at the west end where a platform replaced the pulpit and stained glass was put in the chancel's Palladian window. In 1954, the pedimented belfry replaced the original. The last regular services were held here in the early 1900s. Today, in part because the building lacks electricity and modern plumbing, services occur only in the summer. St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Montrose, Susquehanna County, has had responsibility for St. Matthew's since the 1930s. Stevensville is a small village named for Colonel Abram Stevens, who raised and led a regiment in the War of 1812, but peace came before the unit saw action.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "St. Matthew's Episcopal Church", [Le Raysville, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-BR6.

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