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Nueces County Courthouse

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1977, Smyth and Smyth; Kipp and Winston; Wiznia and Peterson; and Bennet, Martin and Solka. 901 Leopard St.

This courthouse replaced the now-vacant one from 1915 in Old Irishtown ( CC9). Fronted by a plaza that interrupts the flow of the once tightly knit historic fabric, the eleven-story cream-colored county government seat, with undulating walls, parapets, and oversized, oval-shaped window surrounds, stands apart from its neighbors in a 1970s neo-Formalist adaptation of the Baroque.

The courthouse was an attempt by the city to instigate new development along the marginalized Leopard Street commercial corridor. Ironically, the revitalization effort required the removal of five city blocks of residential and commercial buildings, among which was included the Salón de Obreros y Obreras, the 1929 birthplace of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC).

Writing Credits

Author: 
Gerald Moorhead et al.
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Citation

Gerald Moorhead et al., "Nueces County Courthouse", [Corpus Christi, Texas], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/TX-01-CC18.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Texas

Buildings of Texas, Gerald Moorhead and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 242-242.

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