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Francis Land House Historic Site and Garden

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c. 1780–1810. c. 1912, roof raised. c. 1920–1930, window alteration and rear porch addition. c. 1954, entrance hood addition and interior renovation. 1986–present, restoration. 3131 Virginia Beach Blvd. Open to the public
  • Francis Land House Historic Site and Garden

Until the mid-twentieth century, this late Georgian house was at the center of an active farm. Now it is a house museum completely surrounded by commercial and residential development. Built in the late eighteenth century for either Francis Land V or Francis Land VI, planters from a well-established Princess Anne County family, the house is five bays across with a center-passage plan. The walls are constructed of Flemish bond brick without a water table. Around 1912 the gambrel roof was raised to its present height; during the 1920s, the window openings were widened on the main facade, and a wooden porch was added to the rear. The pedimented hood over the front entrance dates from the mid-twentieth century, when the house was converted to a dress shop. Some original paneling survives on the interior, most notably in the dining room. The house is gradually being restored and furnished.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Richard Guy Wilson et al.
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Citation

Richard Guy Wilson et al., "Francis Land House Historic Site and Garden", [Virginia Beach, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-01-VB1.

Print Source

Buildings of Virginia: Tidewater and Piedmont, Richard Guy Wilson and contributors. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 452-452.

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