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Houses on Congress Street

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Late 18th-late 19th century. 9300–9400 blocks of Congress St.
  • William H. Rice House
  • William H. Rice House
  • John W. Clinedinst House
  • John W. Clinedinst House
  • Kring-Henkel House
  • Kring-Henkel House
  • Kring-Henkel House
  • Kring-Henkel House
  • Jacob Stirewalt House
  • Jacob Stirewalt House
  • Jacob Stirewalt House
  • Italianate house at 9400 S. Congress
  • Italianate house at 9400 S. Congress
  • Italianate house at 9400 S. Congress

The frame William H. Rice House (1877; 9329 N. Congress) is two stories with a central front gable and a porch supported on Ionic columns. J. E. Good, a physician who lived here from 1890 into the early twentieth century, added the one-story gable-front office with a steeply pitched gable-roofed portico immediately north of the house. It was later used as the town's telegraph office. At 9349 N. Congress the Italianate-influenced house (1882) was built for John W. Clinedinst, owner of a carriage factory. The Kring-Henkel House (late 18th century; 9383 N. Congress) is a good example of Shenandoah Valley stonecraft. The five-bay facade is built of variously sized limestone blocks bonded together with little mortar. It was the residence of town councilor Joshua Kring by 1806, and was later owned by teacher Abbie Henkel. By 1835 it was used as a general store. Opposite at 9386 N. Congress, the Flemish bond brick house with parapeted gable ends and refined doorway was built c. 1806 for Jacob Stirewalt. At 9400 S. Congress, the late-nineteenth-century two-story brick house with a three-story projecting pavilion is one of the county's finest Italianate dwellings. The facade features round-arched windows and louvered round-arched shutters, a bracketed cornice with a paneled brick frieze, and a bracketed porch.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Houses on Congress Street", [New Market, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-SH32.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 76-76.

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