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House

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1919. 209 Weeks St., Bennington village

This two-story mail-order house was manufactured by the Aladdin Company of Bay City, Michigan. It is typical of the Craftsman- and bungalow-influenced designs offered by Aladdin and other early-twentieth-century producers between 1910 and 1930, when mail-order houses became common throughout the nation. With a Craftsman-dressed side-hall plan, this version is notable for its deep eaves supported by triangular knee braces, exposed rafter tails, and a full-front porch extended to form a porte-cochere with squat wooden posts atop massive cobblestone piers. Local building contractors Walter and Erwin Dunham poured the concrete foundation, assembled and finished the house from lumber and building components shipped by rail, and added the decorative cobblestone masonry finishes. The Dunhams also built houses and duplexes of their own design in Bennington.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson
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Citation

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson, "House", [Bennington, Vermont], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VT-01-BE31.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont, Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 55-55.

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