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Owen House

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1815. 1550 Hinesburg Rd., City of South Burlington

Although wooden houses were the rule, this stone house, with two-foot-thick walls, is a landmark of early vernacular in Vermont. It is a typical, plainly dressed but handsome Cape Cod with a central entrance that has a flush transom and a massive central chimney that serves five fireplaces and two ovens. Like many others of its type, it has a basement exposed at the rear to light its ground-floor seasonal kitchen and oven. According to tradition, owner Abel Owen built the house himself out of the timber and hemlock, clay, and stone on his farm. Although the materials likely did come from his farm, Abel almost certainly had some help. Inside, its paneled and wainscoted treatments are intact. After nearly two hundred years, and a sympathetic restoration in 1932 when the chimney was rebuilt, the farm was subdivided for a housing development called Stone House Meadows. The house underwent a complete renovation in the early twenty-first century.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson
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Citation

Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson, "Owen House", [South Burlington, Vermont], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VT-01-CH48.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Vermont

Buildings of Vermont, Glenn M. Andres and Curtis B. Johnson. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2013, 170-170.

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