You are here

Science Building

-A A +A
1999–2001, Loschky, Marquardt and Nesholm with Moore Ruble Yudell Architects. 1745 Jefferson Ave.
  • (Photograph by Julie Nicoletta)

Along with the Keystone Building immediately to the east, the Science Building, designed by Loschky, Marquardt and Nesholm Architects (LMN), was part of Phase 2a of the university’s master plan. The building, with its laboratories, classrooms, and faculty offices entirely of new construction, was the first purpose-built science building on campus, and one of the two first buildings constructed anew at the University of Washington Tacoma.

The Science Building’s red brick–clad vertical exterior strips reference the material palette of surrounding older buildings, while its largely unadorned exterior and large expanses of glass recall their industrial purpose. The southern facade has a two-story-tall glass wall admitting natural light into the wide stair hall and lobby on the south side of the building. A small greenhouse graces the roof.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
Coordinator: 
J. Philip Gruen
Robert R. Franklin
×

Data

Timeline

  • 1999

    Design and construction

What's Nearby

Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Science Building", [Tacoma, Washington], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WA-01-053-0056-15.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,