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Russell Hibbard House

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1939, William V. Kaeser. 1505 Wood Ln.

Here the full expression of Kaeser’s personal style can be seen—modern, yet undeniably regional, fusing Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie School idioms with the principles of the avant-garde International Style. Kaeser had studied architecture with Eliel Saarinen, a leading modernist who encouraged an eclectic approach. Perhaps prodded by his mentor, Kaeser grasped the continuity between the International and Prairie styles. The unadorned, white stucco walls appear as merely a thin skin enclosing a volume of space, in keeping with the International Style. Ribbons of windows enhance the effect; turning the corners and sheltered by a cantilevered flat roof and deep eaves, they look like voids cut into the membranous walls. At the same time, horizontal lines evoke the flat midwestern landscape, which distinguishes the Prairie Style.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Marsha Weisiger et al.
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Citation

Marsha Weisiger et al., "Russell Hibbard House", [Madison, Wisconsin], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WI-01-DA18.

Print Source

Buildings of Wisconsin

Buildings of Wisconsin, Marsha Weisiger and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2017, 436-436.

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