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YMCA

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1908, Harding and Upman. 224–226 West King St. (north side of West King St. between South College and South Maple sts.)

Manufacturers Record, taking note of Martinsburg's YMCA while it was under construction, described it as “Spanish style of architecture” with a “front of light stucco with stone trimmings, roof of Spanish tile.” The building rises three stories, and the ends of its stuccoed facade are marked by narrow bays that project another half story above the roofline to terminate in curved parapets. The broader three central bays are covered with a sloping roof supported on deep, paired brackets. After serving a term as Martinsburg's city hall, the former YMCA building was rehabilitated as a private residence.

The architects showed an elevation drawing at the 1908 Exhibition of the Washington, D.C., Architectural Club. The drawing shows that the west entrance was for men and that on the east for boys. As if to recall Martinsburg's divided loyalties during the Civil War, the delineator showed a poster next to the men's entrance advertising a baseball game: “Grays vs. Blues.”

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
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Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "YMCA", [Martinsburg, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-BE8.

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