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Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building

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Kanawha National Bank
1912–1915, Weber, Werner and Adkins. 1986, Paul D. Marshall and Associates (facade restoration). East corner of Capitol and Virginia sts.
  • Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building
  • Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building
  • Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building
  • Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building
  • Security Building (Kanawha National Bank) and Frankenberger Building

These almost Siamese twins, born on a drawing board in Cincinnati, grew up together, reached identical heights, and wear the same brilliant white terra-cotta garb. One chose a career in banking, the other in commerce, and that made all the difference. The bank on the corner presents a formal facade to the street, with Corinthian columns and pilasters, and quietly announces its name high on the second-story frieze. The commercial sibling is far more open, shouting Frankenberger from atop its first-story entrance. Above, Frankenberger has three full floors of mostly window wall. Continuing their upward climb, the two buildings are relatively seamless. At head height, they assert their individuality again. Frankenberger sports something of a crew cut, the financial whiz kid a much fuller head of cornice.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.

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