You are here

Nancy Hanks House

-A A +A
1933. End of Mineral County 6/2, reached via Mineral County 6/1, 1 mile west of the intersection with Mineral County 9, 3.2 miles south of Antioch

The story of Nancy Hanks, Abraham Lincoln's mother, has long fascinated Americans. In the early twentieth century, historians suggested that she had been born in 1783 to Lucy Hanks, the unmarried daughter of pioneers living on the east slope of Saddle Mountain in presentday Mineral County. In 1933 the Nancy Hanks Association built this log cabin to mark her putative birthplace. As it turns out, a number of other places (fifty-seven, according to the 1941 WPA guide), were also claimants. The guide also noted that there was “not one shred of evidence that Nancy Hanks ever lived within several hundred miles of [the] spot.” When the cabin was built, its setting was pristine, and it easily suggested the sense of place that may well have persisted at the birth site, wherever it was. Unfortunately, vacation houses are now encroaching on the property. With its V-notched square logs, wood-shake roof, front porch supported by rounded log posts, and single fieldstone chimney, the cabin is at least a convincing replica of a pioneer log cabin.

Writing Credits

Author: 
S. Allen Chambers Jr.
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

S. Allen Chambers Jr., "Nancy Hanks House", [New Creek, West Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WV-01-MN7.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,