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Kapolei Hale

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2001, Kober/Hansen/Mitchell Architects. 1000 Uluohia St.

This city and county government building, a pastiche of 1920s–1930s Hawaiian-regionalist designs, rises above the ordinary. With an unbalanced H-plan, the building balances an open hospitality with an imposing government presence. The Uluohia Street facade flirts with memories of Hale Auhau (OA56), while the inspiration for the Kamokila Boulevard side derives from the Alexander and Baldwin Building (OA34). The open-beamed, three-story entrance court is reminiscent of Honolulu Hale's (OA62), but with proportions typical of the atriums in Hyatt hotels, while the suspended ceiling lights were inspired by the U.S. Immigration Station (OA86). The pilasters' thatched pattern and the blind masonry grillework offer decorative relief to the otherwise plain stucco exterior walls, and the nicely detailed coffered ceilings and koa accents add a sense of interior warmth. Even the restrooms are finely finished.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Don J. Hibbard
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Citation

Don J. Hibbard, "Kapolei Hale", [Kapolei, Hawaii], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/HI-01-OA175.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Hawaii

Buildings of Hawaii, Don J. Hibbard. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011, 179-179.

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