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Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans/The Leeds-Davis Building (Leeds Iron Foundry)

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1852, Gallier and Turpin; 1998 renovated, Wettermark and Keiffer Architects. 923 Tchoupitoulas St.
  • (Photograph by Lake Douglas)

Designed by James Gallier Jr. for Gallier and Turpin, this three-story building was the warehouse and showroom for the Leeds Iron Foundry, one part of which was located on this block and another part upriver. Established in 1825, the foundry, the second largest in the South before the Civil War, manufactured steam engines, boilers, and machinery for sugar processing and sawmills and produced the first operational submarine in the United States (CSS Pioneer, 1861), as well as cannons and other matériel for the Confederacy. The Gothic Revival cast-iron window tracery, hood moldings, and ground-floor clustered columns, all manufactured by the foundry, served to advertise its products. Appropriately, the Preservation Resource Center purchased this endangered building in 1998, restored it, and opened it in 2000 as its headquarters and a center for preservation activities and information.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas
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Data

Timeline

  • 1852

    Built
  • 1998

    Renovated

What's Nearby

Citation

Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas, "Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans/The Leeds-Davis Building (Leeds Iron Foundry)", [New Orleans, Louisiana], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/LA-02-OR120.

Print Source

buildings of new orleans book

Buildings of New Orleans, Karen Kingsley and Lake Douglas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2018, 149-149.

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