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Trinity Episcopal Church

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1886–1887, Charles Brigham. 131 W. Emerson St.
  • Trinity Episcopal Church

Until 1886 Charles Brigham had been in partnership with John Hubbard Sturgis, the English-trained architect with whom he designed the first Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and the Church of the Advent (BH46) on Beacon Hill. Trinity Episcopal Church is an important work by Brigham alone, just after the end of the partnership. For the body of the Melrose church, he used a quarry-faced ashlar granite from Gloucester with window and door trim from quarries in Lynnfield. The dark shade of granite and the slate roofs contrast with Tudor half timbering in the peaks of the gable ends and the upper section of the tower. In 1936, William H. Smith added the parish house; in 1955, Collens, Willis and Bechonert designed the church school addition.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Keith N. Morgan
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Citation

Keith N. Morgan, "Trinity Episcopal Church", [Melrose, Massachusetts], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MA-01-MR5.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Massachusetts

Buildings of Massachusetts: Metropolitan Boston, Keith N. Morgan, with Richard M. Candee, Naomi Miller, Roger G. Reed, and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009, 396-397.

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