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Curwood Castle (James Oliver Curwood Studio)

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James Oliver Curwood Studio
1922, Harold A. Childs. 224 Curwood Castle Dr.

Curwood Castle is a small French Norman fantasy created by Lansing architect Childs to serve as the writing studio of adventure author and conservationist James Oliver Curwood (1878–1927). The asymmetrical picturesque castle is marked with conical-roofed towers. Decorative boulders project at widely spaced intervals from the stucco exterior walls. A spiral staircase winds up the tallest tower to a tiny round room lighted with eleven long, narrow, round-arched windows. Here, during the last four years of his life, Curwood continued writing his popular novels about the Northwest and Canadian North that drew on his boyhood interest in the great forests of Michigan. Curwood met movie directors and publishers in the castle's beamed hall with stage and fireplace.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Kathryn Bishop Eckert
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Citation

Kathryn Bishop Eckert, "Curwood Castle (James Oliver Curwood Studio)", [Owosso, Michigan], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/MI-01-SE3.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Michigan

Buildings of Michigan, Kathryn Bishop Eckert. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 338-338.

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