You are here

St. Michael’s Catholic Church

-A A +A
1908, Hancock Brothers. 560 5th Ave. N

St. Michael’s towers over a residential neighborhood on the nothern fringes of downtown. Built during the Second Great Dakota Boom, it is the largest church in the state and the only church of Romanesque design in Grand Forks County. The nave seats about 725 people, with room for another 225 worshippers in the sacristies and choir loft. The massive and symmetrical Romanesque Revival church under a steeply pitched roof is constructed of red brick with sandstone lintels, sills, and water table. A large rose window fills the gable between a pair of 106-foot-tall square bell towers. The towers are surmounted with bellcast domes covered with gold-painted metal. Exterior ornamentation includes semicircular arches and a blind arcade outlining the front gable.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "St. Michael’s Catholic Church", [Grand Forks, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-GF23.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 82-82.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,