You are here

Apartment Building (Washington School)

-A A +A
Washington School
1907, William J. Edwards. 422 N 6th St.

Within the context of the Second Great Dakota Boom, unprecedented increases in the student population necessitated construction of several new schools. Edwards’s design for the three-story school was tentatively approved by the school board, but after a more scrupulous review by board member James Dinnie, a brickmason-contractor accustomed to estimating new construction, the design was judged too costly. Edwards proposed some modest cost-cutting changes and the board adopted the less costly design “without affecting the appearance or efficiency of the building.” Washington School bears a few classical influences, prominent keystones, and a strongly projecting cornice. The school has been converted into apartments.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay, "Apartment Building (Washington School)", [Grand Forks, North Dakota], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ND-01-GF24.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of North Dakota

Buildings of North Dakota, Steve C. Martens and Ronald H. L. M. Ramsay. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 82-82.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,