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Carson Valley School

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1916, Albert Kelsey. 1419 Bethlehem Pike, Flourtown, 4 miles south of Ambler

There may be no more delightful complex in the region than Kelsey's orphanage for girls, which was intended to equal Philadelphia's Girard College. Where Thomas Ustick Walter paid homage to ancient history and hierarchical culture in his great Greek temple central building for Girard College ( PH127), Kelsey looked to the fairytales and Mother Goose nursery rhymes for child-centered images. He avoided a central building altogether, creating instead a series of small houselike residences for separate ages with classrooms integral to the complex. Gray schist buildings are accented with splendid tile roofs in brilliant hues of red, orange, golds, greens, and blues and ornamented with sculptural plaques that place the buildings in the developmental sequence of the children, from a stork-accented building for infants on.

Writing Credits

Author: 
George E. Thomas
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Citation

George E. Thomas, "Carson Valley School", [Flourtown, Pennsylvania], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/PA-02-MO35.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of PA vol 2

Buildings of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia and Eastern Pennsylvania, George E. Thomas, with Patricia Likos Ricci, Richard J. Webster, Lawrence M. Newman, Robert Janosov, and Bruce Thomas. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012, 208-209.

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