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Norfolk Southern Building

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1992, Smallwood, Reynolds, Stewart, Stewart and Associates. 110 Franklin Rd. SE

Following a trend toward housing prosperous companies in high-rise buildings with glass walls, the railroad company left its offices on Railroad Hill for this spacious, landscaped downtown lot. The building's materials of gray granite, precast concrete, and smoky-blue glass are enlivened by maroon mullions and brown spandrels. From its arcaded base to its cornice, the building makes clear references to classical elements, though here simplified and stylized. The building's massing is symmetrical, but breaks from the usual rectangle with a recessed central bay and corners. A glazed round-headed arch crowns each of the central bays, and the mansard roof makes a sober reference to one of the favorite elements of barely bygone Postmodern architecture.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Anne Carter Lee
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Citation

Anne Carter Lee, "Norfolk Southern Building", [Roanoke, Virginia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/VA-02-RK20.

Print Source

Cover: Buildings of Virginia vol 2

Buildings of Virginia: Valley, Piedmont, Southside, and Southwest, Anne Carter Lee and contributors. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2015, 411-412.

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