You are here

F. W. Woolworth Co. Store

-A A +A
1930s, unknown. 1231 Good Hope Rd. SE
  • F. W. Woolworth Co. Store
  • F. W. Woolworth Co. Store
  • F. W. Woolworth Co. Store

This Woolworth's is the best preserved of all of Washington's five-and-ten-cent stores, a rapidly disappearing typology. Miraculously, it retains its shiny red metal frieze with original gold lettering and logo. The rectilinear glass storefront was designed to display merchandise as openly as possible (while keeping it under cover) in order to entice shoppers into the interior. Angled glass walls lead to two deeply set glass doors, intended to allow easy access to the shopping area or the soda fountain. Even the Rococo pressed-tin ceiling and vaguely classical wall paneling and window frames survive. Sleek, slick, and cheap in its Art Deco style, it is a remnant of another era now most often found in small-town America.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee
×

Data

What's Nearby

Citation

Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee, "F. W. Woolworth Co. Store", [Washington, District of Columbia], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/DC-01-SE02.

Print Source

Buildings of the District of Columbia, Pamela Scott and Antoinette J. Lee. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993, 273-274.

If SAH Archipedia has been useful to you, please consider supporting it.

SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

, ,