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Tioga Building

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1890, Rothe and Company. 1901 Jefferson Ave.
  • (Photograph by Julie Nicoletta)

The old Tioga Building stands just to the north of the Tioga Library Building; a staircase in the new structure provides access to the older building from the south. Red brick walls enlivened by numerous rectangular and arched window openings and ornamental brickwork rise four stories tall. The structure’s trapezoidal footprint follows the shape of its lot, and like the other late-nineteenth-century warehouses in the area, milled lumber was used to support the interior.

The Tioga Building has housed many businesses over the years, including the Richmond and Stoppenbach Paper Company, followed by the Pacific Broom Company and the Liberty Manufacturing Company. For many years, JET Equipment and Tools used the building until the university purchased it in 1991. Since then, the building has been leased to small businesses as it awaits plans for future renovation.

Writing Credits

Author: 
Julie Nicoletta
Coordinator: 
J. Philip Gruen
Robert R. Franklin
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Data

Timeline

  • 1890

    Design and construction
  • 1978

    Renovation

What's Nearby

Citation

Julie Nicoletta, "Tioga Building", [Tacoma, Washington], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/WA-01-053-0056-13.

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