SAH Archipedia uses terms from the Getty Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT) to categorize and classify metadata for the entries in the database. For more information on the Getty AAT, click here

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Ojibwa (culture or style)
Refers to the culture of the Ojibwa, who were Algonquian-speaking Indians who formerly lived along the northern shore of Lake Huron and both shores of Lake Superior from what is now Minnesota to the Turtle Mountains of North Dakota.

Old English (culture or style)
Refers to the style of English domestic architecture in the second half of the nineteenth century and characterized by the use of traditional English materials and forms such as mullioned windows, half-timbered walls, pitched roofs, and tall ornamental chimneys.

Omaha
No description available for this term.

Oneida (culture or style)
No description available for this term.

organic architecture
A philosophy of architectural design, emerging in the early 20th century, asserting that in structure and appearance a building should be based on organic forms and should harmonize with its natural environment.

Orientalism
Characteristics of oriental art or culture appearing in Western practice.

Osage (culture or style)
No description available for this term.

Oto
No description available for this term.

Ottawa
No description available for this term.

outsider art
Refers to art created or collected according to a philosophy of avoidance of the conventional fine art tradition. The concept generally refers to art that fits the ideal described by Jean Dubuffet, who posited that art should be inventive, non-conformist, unprocessed, spontaneous, insulated from all social and cultural influences, "brut," created without thought of financial gain or public recognition, and based upon autonomous inspiration, in direct contrast to the stereotypes of the traditional or official artistic culture. Dubuffet sought such art in the work of psychiatric patients and other insulated individuals. It is generally distinct from "naive art," which is created by those without formal training, but not necessarily in accordance with the principles described above. It is also typically distinct from "folk art," which is made according to the rules and traditions of a particular culture.

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